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5 Types of Deck Footings: Which One is Right for You?

When building a deck, the type of footings you use is an important decision. There are many different types of deck footings, each with its own set of pros and cons. 

This blog post will discuss five types of deck footings: poured concrete footings, buried post footings, precast cement footings, deck blocks, and screw/helical piles. 

We will break down the pros and cons of each type so that you can make an informed decision about which one is right for you!

blue house and wooden deck

What are deck footings and what do they do for your deck?

A deck footing is the foundation of your deck. It is a large, concrete foot that is buried in the ground and supports the weight of your deck.

Deck footings are an important part of your deck. They provide the necessary foundation and stability for your deck. There are several types of deck footings to choose from, so selecting the right one is important.

This is an important part of building your deck because it ensures its safety and stability. Be sure to consult with your local building codes before selecting a deck footing type. But before you do that, let’s dive deeper into the pros and cons of each type.

front porch deck and light green home

The 5 types of footings you can choose from

There are many different types of deck footings to choose from, each with its own set of pros and cons, so let’s get started!

Poured Concrete Footings

Poured concrete deck footings are the most common type of deck footing. They are usually used for decks that are larger or taller than average. Poured concrete footings involve digging a hole in the ground and then pouring concrete into it. The concrete should be poured to a depth that is at least 12 inches below the frost line.

Once the concrete has hardened, the deck can be attached to the footings. Poured concrete footings provide a lot of stability and support for your deck. They are a good option for decks that are located in areas with cold winters.

Pros of poured concrete footings

Cons of poured concrete footings

Buried Post Footings

Buried post deck footings involve burying four posts in the ground and then attaching the deck to the posts. This is a good option for decks that are not very large or tall. The depth of the post footings will depend on the frost line in your area.

The deck should be attached to the posts with carriage bolts or lag screws. This type of deck footing is not as common as poured concrete footings, but it is a good option for decks that are located in areas with unstable ground.

Pros of buried post deck footings

Cons of buried post deck footings

deck footings in cement block

Precast Cement Footings

Precast cement block footings are a popular choice for smaller decks. They are easy to install and do not require any digging. Precast deck footings are made out of cement and come in different shapes and sizes.

The most common type of precast deck footing is the pier deck footing. Pier deck footings involve setting a concrete pier in the ground and then attaching the deck to it. This type of deck footing is easy to install and does not require any digging.

Pros of precast deck footings

Cons of precast deck footings

Deck Blocks

Deck blocks are a good option for decks that are being built on a concrete slab. Deck blocks are made out of concrete and come in different shapes and sizes.

The most common type of deck block is the square deck block. Square deck blocks are easy to install and do not require any digging. They are also less expensive than other types of deck footings.

Pros of deck blocks

Cons of deck blocks

cement block and wood footings

Screw/ Helical Piles

Screw/helical piles are a good option for decks that are located on soft soil or unstable ground. They are made out of steel and are driven into the ground with a hydraulic screwdriver.

This type of deck footing is more expensive than other types of deck footings, but it is a good option for decks that are located in areas with unstable ground.

Pros of screw/helical piles

Cons of screw/helical piles

Conclusion

We hope this article has helped you understand the basics of deck footings, the pros, and cons of each type so that you can know which one can suit your needs the best. If you’re still unsure, get in touch with us! Our experts are ready to help guide you through your next project or answer any questions that may arise during construction.